April

What historic events happened in April?

April

April 1, 1848

The Burlington Free Press becomes the first daily newspaper published in Vermont.

What Makes the News? (PDF)

April 4, 1970 

On this date the Vermont legislature passed a piece of legislation designed to protect the state's scenic landscape. Act 250, as the Land Use and Development Law was called, was the first legislation of its kind to be passed anywhere in the United States. 

Protecting Vermont's Air, Land and Water (PDF)

April 5, 1817

Ann Story, one of Vermont's most courageous pioneers, raised five children alone on the frontier at Salisbury, survived many catastrophes, remained loyal to the Green Mountain Boys, and died on this date at the age of eighty-two.

Ann Story, A Vermont Pioneer (PDF)

April 10, 1810

William Jarvis loads Merino sheep on board a ship in Spain. Their destination is Vermont, where they will begin the boom in sheep farming.

April 14, 1810

Justin Morrill, Vermont senator and author of the U.S. Land Grant College Act, was born on this day. The Land Grant Act, which was signed into law in 1862 by President Abraham Lincoln, established a public agricultural college in every state. Justin Morrill's Gothic cottage in Strafford, Vermont, is an historic landmark and is open to the public.

April 21, 1844 

Preacher William Miller and his followers predict that the world will come to an end on this day. Miller urges people to give away all they own and to devote themselves to prayer.

April 21, 1920

Four hundred women gather in Montpelier, in the pouring rain, in support of the nineteenth amendment giving women the right to vote.

April 23, 1823

Stephen A. Douglas, the politician who ran against Abraham Lincoln in the 1860 presidential election, was born in Brandon, Vermont.

April 23, 1861

An emergency session of the state legislature is held, due to the outbreak of the Civil War. The first call goes out for volunteers to fight.

"Thank God I am alive yet..." (PDF)

April 29, 1986

The Vermont Senate adopted a resolution encouraging "serious scientific inquiry into the existence of any unusual animal in Lake Champlain, especially … the one commonly known as 'Champ.'"

Vermont's Very Own Monster (PDF)